Merry Christmas!

A few more traditional recipes for the Julbord / Christmas table.

3 Sorters Sill (Swedish Pickled Herring)

Swedish style herring can be difficult to find when living abroad. We used to buy ours at IKEA, but this year their selection was limited. Fresh or brined herring filets are really hard to get here in southern California, but we were lucky to find Bismarck Herring at a local European market. I then used the fish to make my own versions of pickled herring.

Juicy Country-Style Ribs

Thick, sticky ribs are always part of our Christmas table and I love them with a little apple sauce on the side. The trick to juicy, tender meat is preboiling first, then grilling or baking with lots of yummy glaze. The best part is that you can do most of the cooking the day before, and just grill/bake them before serving.

Prinskorv (Traditional Swedish Sausage)

Making sausage is easier then you would think, but requires a few special tools. We have missed these precious, little wieners on our Christmas table, so this year we decided to make them ourselves. They turned out delicious, in fact they taste better than store bought!

Polkagrisar / Peppermint Candy

Making candy is not difficult as long as you take care not to burn yourself on the hot sugar solution. The red and white peppermint flavored candy is a classic, but my favorite is ginger! With heat resistant silicon gloves and a silicone mat it is easy and fun to create your own colorful candy.

Brända Mandlar (Candied Almonds)

This traditional Christmas candy is highly addictive and takes almost no time to make. A seriously dangerous combination! They remind me of my childhood, when we always visited the Christmas market at Stortorget in Gamla Stan (Stockholm Old Town)…

Meringue

This basic recipe works for both crisp and soft meringue. In Sweden we normally make French meringue and it works well for baking, but if you plan to make buttercream you need Swiss or Italian meringue since they are more stable.

Sockerkaka (Basic Vanilla Cake)

In may seem odd to some, but Swedes often eat cake without icing or buttercream. In my opinion, this moist, airy and delicately flavored cake needs nothing but a good cup of coffee or tea – or why not a glass of ice cold milk? A superb base recipe for all your muffins, cupcakes and cakes!